Step Ahead Wellness Center Blog

Sari's Delicious Demo of The Week!

Posted by deborah neiman on Mon, Jan 20, 2014 @ 02:44 PM
Sari's Delicious Demo of The Week!

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Step Ahead Wellness Center Brings You CARB CHECK... Carb Blocking Supplement

Posted by deborah neiman on Tue, Dec 10, 2013 @ 03:11 PM
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If you've been battling carb cravings, Step Ahead Wellness Center can help!  We are thrilled to announce a new carb blocking supplement called CARB CHECK.
 
Carb Check contains a northern white bean that inhibits the breakdown of starch in the intestinal track, thus alleviating cravings for empty carbs. By blocking these empty carbs, you're energy/sugar levels remain steady throughout the day thus making it much easier to stick with your healthy eating plan, and your exercise regime!
 
Let us help you stay on your healthy weight loss track this holiday season and beyond!  Call today to learn more about Carb Check, and all of our weight loss programs:  Call 908-470-2235 or email drneiman@stepaheadwellnesscenter.comwww.stepaheadwellnesscenter.com

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Check Out This Killer Indoor Leg Work Out!

Posted by deborah neiman on Mon, Dec 09, 2013 @ 06:50 AM

While the weather outside is frightful, indoor workouts are delightful!  Check out this killer leg workout you can do wherever, whenever!  No equipment is needed.

 

badweatherworkout

 

Let Step Ahead Wellness Center meet all your fitness, healthy weight loss goals... See our website at www.stepaheadwellnesscenter.com for our latest special weight loss offer.

 

Email our fitness director, certified personal trainer, Noelle Lusardi, at noelle@stepaheadwellnesscenter.com for more fit tips.

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Daily Turkey Day Tip

Posted by deborah neiman on Thu, Nov 21, 2013 @ 01:38 PM

Check out Sari's Daily Turkey Day Recipe! 

 

Butternut Squash-Leek Soup

Unknown

 

-1 whole garlic head

-1 tablespoon olive oil

-6 cups thinly sliced leek (about 4 large)

-4 cups (3/4 – inch) cubed peeled butternut squash (about 1 medium)

-2 cups water

-2 cups fat-free, less sodium chicken broth

-1/2 teaspoon salt

-1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

1. Preheat oven to 350º.

2. Remove white papery skin from garlic head (do not peel or separate the cloves). Wrap head in foil. Bake at 350º for 1 hour; cool 10 minutes. Separate cloves; squeeze to extract garlic pulp. Discard skins.

3. Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add leek; sauté 5 minutes or until tender. Stir in garlic, squash, 2 cups water, broth, salt, and black pepper; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes or until squash is tender. Place half of squash mixture in a blender lid (to allow steam to escape); secure blender lid on blender. Place a clean towel over the opening in the blender lid (to avoid platters). Blend until smooth. Pour pureed soup into a bowl. Repeat procedure with remaining squash mixture. Yield: 6 servings (serving size: about 1 cup).

 

Calories: 167

Fat: 3.5g

Protein: 4.1 g

Fiber: 5.3g

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Countdown to Thanksgiving

Posted by deborah neiman on Mon, Nov 18, 2013 @ 12:59 PM

Look for us at Step Ahead to help you get through the holidays with less pain and gain!  We are offering you a DAILY TIP to get through Turkey Day,

Either a calorie burner or a calorie builder- yes, exercises and recipes to help make this day more enjoyable and easier for you and your family.

 Today, we will start with one of our fabulous recipes from our dietician, Sari Greaves, who has unique recipes to add spice with very little calorie price!

Turkey with Herbes de Provence and Citrus

withatwist turkey s4x3 med resized 600

 

1 (14 to 15-pound) turkey, neck and giblets reserved 
1 orange, cut into wedges 
1 lemon, cut into wedges 
1 onion, cut into wedges 
6 fresh rosemary sprigs 
6 fresh sage sprigs 
6 fresh oregano sprigs  
2 tablespoons herbes de Provence 
1 tablespoon olive oil 
1 1/2 teaspoons salt 
1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 
6 cups canned low-salt chicken broth (approximate amount) 
1/3 cup whole-wheat flour

To make the turkey: Position the rack in the lowest third of the oven and preheat to 400 degrees F.

Rinse the turkey and pat it dry with paper towels. Place the turkey on a rack set inside a large roasting pan. Place the orange and lemon wedges, onion, and 2 sprigs of each fresh herb in the main turkey cavity. Tie the legs together to hold the shape of the turkey. Stir the herbes de Provence, oil, and 1 1/2 teaspoons of each the salt and pepper in a small saucepan over medium heat just until the butter melts. Rub the mixture all over the turkey and between the turkey breast meat and skin. Place the turkey neck and giblets in roasting pan. (Recipecan be prepared up to this point 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes before roasting.)

Cover the turkey breast with foil. Roast for 20 minutes. Pour 3 cups of broth into the pan and stir to scrape up any brown bits on the bottom of the pan. Add the remaining sprigs of fresh herbs to the pan. Roast the turkey for 40 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F.  Pour 1 more cup of broth into the pan. Continue roasting the turkey until a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh registers 165 degrees F to 175 degrees F or until the juices run clear when the thickest part of the thigh is pierced with a skewer, basting occasionally with pan juices, about 1 hour and 30 minutes longer. Transfer the turkey to a platter and tent with foil. Let stand 30 minutes while preparing the gravy.

To make the gravy: Strain the turkey pan juices from the roasting pan through a sieve and into a 4-cup glass measuring cup; discard the solids. Spoon off the fat from atop the pan juices. Add enough chicken broth, about 1 to 2 cups, to the pan juices to measure 4 cups total. Add the whole wheat flour and whisk for 1 minute. Gradually whisk in the broth. Simmer until the gravy thickens slightly, whisking often, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve the turkey with the gravy.

Serving: 3 oz (white meat-very lean meats)

Calories: 105

Protein: 21g

Fat: 3g

 

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“Chew your food more before swallowing.”

Posted by deborah neiman on Fri, Nov 15, 2013 @ 11:34 AM

Did you know that chewing more may be one way to reduce food intake and potentially help with weight management? Check out this great article below for the scoop.

eating apple image resized 600

Chewing More Could Mean Eating Less

Author Info

Reviewed by: 
Joseph V. Madia, MD By:

Chewing food more was shown to reduce total food intake in a group of normal weight and overweight people

November 14, 2013

(dailyRx News) When midday hunger hits and it's time to eat, you might not be thinking about how much you chew your food. But by doing so, you could end up eating less.

 

A recent study found a significant decrease in the amount of food eaten when people chewed their food more.

The authors of this study noted that chewing more may be one way to reduce food intake and potentially help with weight management.

Chew your food more before swallowing.

This study was led by James H. Hollis, PhD, of the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State University. The research team examined whether increasing the number of chews before swallowing food affected meal size in normal weight, overweight and obese people.

Dr. Hollis and colleagues analyzed data from 45 people between the ages of 18 and 45 in Ames, Iowa.

People were excluded from this study if they had previously used or were currently using tobacco products, were underweight, had a history of gastrointestinal disease, were on medication that altered appetite, were dieting or restricting calories, were allergic to the test foods or were pregnant or lactating.

At the beginning of the study, participants were given five servings of Tostino’s pizza rolls and asked to report how many times they chewed their food before swallowing. A researcher sat with each participant to confirm this number.

After this assessment, participants attended three test sessions during their usual lunch time. Each test session was seven days apart.

On each test day, participants were asked to eat their usual breakfast and to avoid alcohol or strenuous exercise for 24 hours before the test session. They were also told not to eat or drink any food after breakfast, with the exception of water, until the test session began.

During the test session, each participant was given 60 Tostino’s pizza rolls. They were told how many times they had to chew before swallowing. Some participants were told to chew their food the same number of times that they chewed at the beginning of the study, some were told to increase their number of chews by 50 percent and some were told to double their number of chews.

Food intake, meal duration, average eating rate and appetite ratings were recorded at the end of every meal for all test sessions.

The researchers found that participants who increased their number of chews by 50 percent ate 9.5 percent less than participants who were told to chew their food the same number of times.

Participants who doubled their number of chews decreased their food intake by about 15 percent compared to those who were told to chew their food the same number of times.

The researchers also found that increasing the number of chews increased meal duration and reduced eating rate.

The researchers did not find a significant difference, however, in appetite ratings between the groups.

The authors of this study noted that normal weight participants had a slower eating rate than overweight and obese participants, which supports previous research. They concluded that more studies are needed to determine the long-term effects of increased chewing on body weight.

This study was published on November 9 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

The study authors reported no competing interests.

http://www.dailyrx.com/chewing-food-more-was-shown-reduce-total-food-intake-group-normal-weight-and-overweight-people

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Tips to drink smart while dieting

Posted by deborah neiman on Mon, Nov 11, 2013 @ 11:27 AM

Tips to drink smart while dieting

martini shaker 640 resized 600

As a dietitian and as someone who enjoys socializing over cocktails, I believe that you don’t have to give up alcohol just because you are trying to lose weight. This is supported by research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine that found that light to moderate drinkers actually gain less weight over time than teetotalers, and they also have a lower chance of becoming overweight or obese.

I know this from experience working with my clients who consistently lose weight without abstaining from alcohol. Instead of asking them to cut out alcohol, I help them learn to drink a bit smarter by avoiding unnecessary calories.

Lighten your usual drink

It’s easy to order a less caloric version of your usual drink. For example, have vodka, tequila or other spirits with zero-calorie club soda and a splash of juice instead of an 80 calorie cup of tonic. For nearly the same calories, you can relax over two rum and Diet Cokes or have one specialty cocktail, such as a cosmopolitan.

Make yours a spritzer

Do like the Europeans and have a wine spritzer (half wine, half club soda) that’s refreshing and waist-friendly at about 50 calories a glass.

Beware of mixed drinks

A single margarita or other sugary cocktails can pack anywhere from 450 – 600 calories! Opt instead for tequila with a splash of juice and a wedge of lime, or order a drink made with light vodka in your favorite flavor mixed with zero-calorie soda water.

Sip wine and spirits

Your best bet for low-cal drinking is wine and spirits, because these contain about 90 calories per drink.

Pace yourself

If you plan to have only one drink, order one that you will linger over. For example, a martini is practically straight liquor, but shaken with ice and an aromatic splash of vermouth, it is a reasonable 160 calories per 2.5-ounce glass. If you expect to have more than one cocktail, try alternating with a glass of water or seltzer with a wedge of lemon or lime.

Tip: Try my lighter twist on a classic cocktail – Basil Bloody Mary 

By Tanya Zuckerbrot

Published November 06, 2013

FoxNews.com

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FDA to Ban Trans Fat in Foods

Posted by deborah neiman on Fri, Nov 08, 2013 @ 10:40 AM

FDA to Ban Trans Fats in Foods

The artificial additives are linked to heart trouble, doctors say

U.S. health officials announced Thursday a plan to phase out heart-harmful trans fats in processed foods and restaurant fare.

trans fat resized 600

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg said the proposed restrictions on the use of trans fats could prevent 20,000 heart attacks a year and 7,000 deaths.

"The agency has made a preliminary determination that partially hydrogenated oils, a major source of artificial trans fat in processed foods, are not generally recognized as safe for use in food," Hamburg said during a morning news conference. "This is an important step for removing harmful trans fats from processed foods."

Many food companies and restaurants have eliminated trans fats over the past decade, in part because of FDA nutrition label changes enacted in 2006. And some local governments, including New York City, already prohibit their use.

These restrictions have helped reduce trans fat intake among Americans from 4.6 grams daily in 2003 to about 1 gram a day in 2012, the FDA said.

Even so, Hamburg said trans fats "remain an area of significant public health concern." Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The Institute of Medicine concluded that trans fats provide no known health benefits and there is no safe level of consumption of trans fats, Hamburg added.

The medical community welcomed the news about trans fats.

"This represents a very important move by the FDA to help further reduce trans fat dietary intake and improve cardiovascular health in the United States," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, spokesman for the American Heart Association and a cardiology professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Many cookies and other baked goods, some microwave pizzas, ready-to-eat frostings and a host of other everyday foods contain trans fats, which are often labeled partially hydrogenated oils.

Trans fats raise total blood cholesterol levels even more than saturated fats, which can lead to heart disease, Fonarow said. They also raise LDL (bad) cholesterol and lower HDL (good) cholesterol when used instead of natural oils, he said.

Clinical trials of diets containing trans fats have shown an increased risk of heart attack and premature cardiovascular death, Fonarow added.

Currently, trans fats fall in a category of additives "generally recognized as safe" by the FDA. Under the new proposal, they would be removed from that list and food manufacturers would need to petition the agency before using them. But FDA approval of such petitions is considered unlikely.

Widely used to improve the shelf life, flavor or texture of foods, trans fats are made by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil to solidify it.

Many restaurant chains no longer use trans fats, but smaller restaurants may still get trans fats-containing foods from suppliers or use the fats for frying.

The FDA said it would take public comments for two months before setting a timeline to complete the phase-out. "We need to know how much time would be needed for industry to remove partially hydrogenated oils from processed food products should this preliminary determination be finalized," Hamburg said.

Dr. Kenneth Ong, the interim chief of cardiology at Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York City, said there are "only a couple of reasons manufacturers use trans fats -- maybe the taste and perhaps the cost. But I am not familiar with any health benefits. In fact, there is much more data to show the opposite."

Samantha Heller, senior clinical nutritionist at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, said the only real way to know if a food contains trans fats is to look at the ingredient list for "partially hydrogenated" oils. "This means there are trans fats in that food. Put it back on the shelf and find another option," she said.

Added Rebecca Solomon, a clinical nutrition coordinator at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City: "Nothing good can come from people consuming trans fats. At the end of the day our food technology is sophisticated enough that there are healthier alternatives."

By Steven Reinberg and Margaret Farley Steele
HealthDay Reporters

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about trans fats.



SOURCES: Gregg Fonarow, M.D., spokesman, American Heart Association, and professor, cardiology, University of California, Los Angeles; Kenneth Ong, M.D., interim chief, cardiology, Brooklyn Hospital Center, New York City; Samantha Heller, M.S., R.D., senior clinical nutritionist, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York City; Rebecca Solomon, clinical nutrition coordinator, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City; Nov. 7, 2013, news conference with Margaret Hamburg, M.D., commissioner, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

http://m.healthday.com/iphone_article.htm?CID=0B3F45B2&NFID=C&articleId=681939

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