Step Ahead Wellness Center Blog

Countdown to Thanksgiving

Posted by deborah neiman on Mon, Nov 18, 2013 @ 12:59 PM

Look for us at Step Ahead to help you get through the holidays with less pain and gain!  We are offering you a DAILY TIP to get through Turkey Day,

Either a calorie burner or a calorie builder- yes, exercises and recipes to help make this day more enjoyable and easier for you and your family.

 Today, we will start with one of our fabulous recipes from our dietician, Sari Greaves, who has unique recipes to add spice with very little calorie price!

Turkey with Herbes de Provence and Citrus

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1 (14 to 15-pound) turkey, neck and giblets reserved 
1 orange, cut into wedges 
1 lemon, cut into wedges 
1 onion, cut into wedges 
6 fresh rosemary sprigs 
6 fresh sage sprigs 
6 fresh oregano sprigs  
2 tablespoons herbes de Provence 
1 tablespoon olive oil 
1 1/2 teaspoons salt 
1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 
6 cups canned low-salt chicken broth (approximate amount) 
1/3 cup whole-wheat flour

To make the turkey: Position the rack in the lowest third of the oven and preheat to 400 degrees F.

Rinse the turkey and pat it dry with paper towels. Place the turkey on a rack set inside a large roasting pan. Place the orange and lemon wedges, onion, and 2 sprigs of each fresh herb in the main turkey cavity. Tie the legs together to hold the shape of the turkey. Stir the herbes de Provence, oil, and 1 1/2 teaspoons of each the salt and pepper in a small saucepan over medium heat just until the butter melts. Rub the mixture all over the turkey and between the turkey breast meat and skin. Place the turkey neck and giblets in roasting pan. (Recipecan be prepared up to this point 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes before roasting.)

Cover the turkey breast with foil. Roast for 20 minutes. Pour 3 cups of broth into the pan and stir to scrape up any brown bits on the bottom of the pan. Add the remaining sprigs of fresh herbs to the pan. Roast the turkey for 40 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F.  Pour 1 more cup of broth into the pan. Continue roasting the turkey until a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh registers 165 degrees F to 175 degrees F or until the juices run clear when the thickest part of the thigh is pierced with a skewer, basting occasionally with pan juices, about 1 hour and 30 minutes longer. Transfer the turkey to a platter and tent with foil. Let stand 30 minutes while preparing the gravy.

To make the gravy: Strain the turkey pan juices from the roasting pan through a sieve and into a 4-cup glass measuring cup; discard the solids. Spoon off the fat from atop the pan juices. Add enough chicken broth, about 1 to 2 cups, to the pan juices to measure 4 cups total. Add the whole wheat flour and whisk for 1 minute. Gradually whisk in the broth. Simmer until the gravy thickens slightly, whisking often, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve the turkey with the gravy.

Serving: 3 oz (white meat-very lean meats)

Calories: 105

Protein: 21g

Fat: 3g

 

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“Chew your food more before swallowing.”

Posted by deborah neiman on Fri, Nov 15, 2013 @ 11:34 AM

Did you know that chewing more may be one way to reduce food intake and potentially help with weight management? Check out this great article below for the scoop.

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Chewing More Could Mean Eating Less

Author Info

Reviewed by: 
Joseph V. Madia, MD By:

Chewing food more was shown to reduce total food intake in a group of normal weight and overweight people

November 14, 2013

(dailyRx News) When midday hunger hits and it's time to eat, you might not be thinking about how much you chew your food. But by doing so, you could end up eating less.

 

A recent study found a significant decrease in the amount of food eaten when people chewed their food more.

The authors of this study noted that chewing more may be one way to reduce food intake and potentially help with weight management.

Chew your food more before swallowing.

This study was led by James H. Hollis, PhD, of the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State University. The research team examined whether increasing the number of chews before swallowing food affected meal size in normal weight, overweight and obese people.

Dr. Hollis and colleagues analyzed data from 45 people between the ages of 18 and 45 in Ames, Iowa.

People were excluded from this study if they had previously used or were currently using tobacco products, were underweight, had a history of gastrointestinal disease, were on medication that altered appetite, were dieting or restricting calories, were allergic to the test foods or were pregnant or lactating.

At the beginning of the study, participants were given five servings of Tostino’s pizza rolls and asked to report how many times they chewed their food before swallowing. A researcher sat with each participant to confirm this number.

After this assessment, participants attended three test sessions during their usual lunch time. Each test session was seven days apart.

On each test day, participants were asked to eat their usual breakfast and to avoid alcohol or strenuous exercise for 24 hours before the test session. They were also told not to eat or drink any food after breakfast, with the exception of water, until the test session began.

During the test session, each participant was given 60 Tostino’s pizza rolls. They were told how many times they had to chew before swallowing. Some participants were told to chew their food the same number of times that they chewed at the beginning of the study, some were told to increase their number of chews by 50 percent and some were told to double their number of chews.

Food intake, meal duration, average eating rate and appetite ratings were recorded at the end of every meal for all test sessions.

The researchers found that participants who increased their number of chews by 50 percent ate 9.5 percent less than participants who were told to chew their food the same number of times.

Participants who doubled their number of chews decreased their food intake by about 15 percent compared to those who were told to chew their food the same number of times.

The researchers also found that increasing the number of chews increased meal duration and reduced eating rate.

The researchers did not find a significant difference, however, in appetite ratings between the groups.

The authors of this study noted that normal weight participants had a slower eating rate than overweight and obese participants, which supports previous research. They concluded that more studies are needed to determine the long-term effects of increased chewing on body weight.

This study was published on November 9 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

The study authors reported no competing interests.

http://www.dailyrx.com/chewing-food-more-was-shown-reduce-total-food-intake-group-normal-weight-and-overweight-people

Tags: Personal Weight Loss, Exercise, Weight Loss, diet, meal plans, HEALTHY DIET SHORTCUTS, thanksgiving diet, fitbit, fatty foods, fruit recipes, Diet and Nutrition, healthy eating, fat burning classes, Dr. Neiman, Dr.Oz, prevention, Doctor Supervised Weight Loss, Personal Trainers, Fitness, group excercise classes, Healthy, Healthy Meals, Physician Weight Loss, Healthy Recipes, Heart Disease, Prevention Heart Disease, lose weight, Physician Weight Center, OptiFast, personal training, Doctor, health, Healthy Halloween, healthy entertaining, group exercise, lose weight fast, Step Ahead Wellness Center, healthy cocktails

Tips to drink smart while dieting

Posted by deborah neiman on Mon, Nov 11, 2013 @ 11:27 AM

Tips to drink smart while dieting

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As a dietitian and as someone who enjoys socializing over cocktails, I believe that you don’t have to give up alcohol just because you are trying to lose weight. This is supported by research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine that found that light to moderate drinkers actually gain less weight over time than teetotalers, and they also have a lower chance of becoming overweight or obese.

I know this from experience working with my clients who consistently lose weight without abstaining from alcohol. Instead of asking them to cut out alcohol, I help them learn to drink a bit smarter by avoiding unnecessary calories.

Lighten your usual drink

It’s easy to order a less caloric version of your usual drink. For example, have vodka, tequila or other spirits with zero-calorie club soda and a splash of juice instead of an 80 calorie cup of tonic. For nearly the same calories, you can relax over two rum and Diet Cokes or have one specialty cocktail, such as a cosmopolitan.

Make yours a spritzer

Do like the Europeans and have a wine spritzer (half wine, half club soda) that’s refreshing and waist-friendly at about 50 calories a glass.

Beware of mixed drinks

A single margarita or other sugary cocktails can pack anywhere from 450 – 600 calories! Opt instead for tequila with a splash of juice and a wedge of lime, or order a drink made with light vodka in your favorite flavor mixed with zero-calorie soda water.

Sip wine and spirits

Your best bet for low-cal drinking is wine and spirits, because these contain about 90 calories per drink.

Pace yourself

If you plan to have only one drink, order one that you will linger over. For example, a martini is practically straight liquor, but shaken with ice and an aromatic splash of vermouth, it is a reasonable 160 calories per 2.5-ounce glass. If you expect to have more than one cocktail, try alternating with a glass of water or seltzer with a wedge of lemon or lime.

Tip: Try my lighter twist on a classic cocktail – Basil Bloody Mary 

By Tanya Zuckerbrot

Published November 06, 2013

FoxNews.com

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FDA to Ban Trans Fat in Foods

Posted by deborah neiman on Fri, Nov 08, 2013 @ 10:40 AM

FDA to Ban Trans Fats in Foods

The artificial additives are linked to heart trouble, doctors say

U.S. health officials announced Thursday a plan to phase out heart-harmful trans fats in processed foods and restaurant fare.

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg said the proposed restrictions on the use of trans fats could prevent 20,000 heart attacks a year and 7,000 deaths.

"The agency has made a preliminary determination that partially hydrogenated oils, a major source of artificial trans fat in processed foods, are not generally recognized as safe for use in food," Hamburg said during a morning news conference. "This is an important step for removing harmful trans fats from processed foods."

Many food companies and restaurants have eliminated trans fats over the past decade, in part because of FDA nutrition label changes enacted in 2006. And some local governments, including New York City, already prohibit their use.

These restrictions have helped reduce trans fat intake among Americans from 4.6 grams daily in 2003 to about 1 gram a day in 2012, the FDA said.

Even so, Hamburg said trans fats "remain an area of significant public health concern." Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The Institute of Medicine concluded that trans fats provide no known health benefits and there is no safe level of consumption of trans fats, Hamburg added.

The medical community welcomed the news about trans fats.

"This represents a very important move by the FDA to help further reduce trans fat dietary intake and improve cardiovascular health in the United States," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, spokesman for the American Heart Association and a cardiology professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Many cookies and other baked goods, some microwave pizzas, ready-to-eat frostings and a host of other everyday foods contain trans fats, which are often labeled partially hydrogenated oils.

Trans fats raise total blood cholesterol levels even more than saturated fats, which can lead to heart disease, Fonarow said. They also raise LDL (bad) cholesterol and lower HDL (good) cholesterol when used instead of natural oils, he said.

Clinical trials of diets containing trans fats have shown an increased risk of heart attack and premature cardiovascular death, Fonarow added.

Currently, trans fats fall in a category of additives "generally recognized as safe" by the FDA. Under the new proposal, they would be removed from that list and food manufacturers would need to petition the agency before using them. But FDA approval of such petitions is considered unlikely.

Widely used to improve the shelf life, flavor or texture of foods, trans fats are made by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil to solidify it.

Many restaurant chains no longer use trans fats, but smaller restaurants may still get trans fats-containing foods from suppliers or use the fats for frying.

The FDA said it would take public comments for two months before setting a timeline to complete the phase-out. "We need to know how much time would be needed for industry to remove partially hydrogenated oils from processed food products should this preliminary determination be finalized," Hamburg said.

Dr. Kenneth Ong, the interim chief of cardiology at Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York City, said there are "only a couple of reasons manufacturers use trans fats -- maybe the taste and perhaps the cost. But I am not familiar with any health benefits. In fact, there is much more data to show the opposite."

Samantha Heller, senior clinical nutritionist at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, said the only real way to know if a food contains trans fats is to look at the ingredient list for "partially hydrogenated" oils. "This means there are trans fats in that food. Put it back on the shelf and find another option," she said.

Added Rebecca Solomon, a clinical nutrition coordinator at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City: "Nothing good can come from people consuming trans fats. At the end of the day our food technology is sophisticated enough that there are healthier alternatives."

By Steven Reinberg and Margaret Farley Steele
HealthDay Reporters

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about trans fats.



SOURCES: Gregg Fonarow, M.D., spokesman, American Heart Association, and professor, cardiology, University of California, Los Angeles; Kenneth Ong, M.D., interim chief, cardiology, Brooklyn Hospital Center, New York City; Samantha Heller, M.S., R.D., senior clinical nutritionist, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York City; Rebecca Solomon, clinical nutrition coordinator, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City; Nov. 7, 2013, news conference with Margaret Hamburg, M.D., commissioner, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

http://m.healthday.com/iphone_article.htm?CID=0B3F45B2&NFID=C&articleId=681939

Tags: Personal Weight Loss, Exercise, Weight Loss, diet, jumpstart diet, HEALTHY DIET SHORTCUTS, fitbit, fatty foods, trans fat, fruit recipes, Diet and Nutrition, healthy eating, Dr. Neiman, prevention, Doctor Supervised Weight Loss, Fitness, group excercise classes, Step Ahead exercise classes, Healthy, Healthy Meals, Physician Weight Loss, Healthy Recipes, Nutrition, Heart Disease, lose weight, Doctor, winter blues, health, Weight Loss Center, motivation, Step Ahead, wellness, healthy entertaining, group exercise, lose weight fast, Step Ahead Wellness Center, weight loss apps

Lose Weight With Your Smartphone!

Posted by deborah neiman on Thu, Nov 07, 2013 @ 12:29 PM

Step Ahead's Nutritionist shares her favorite nutrition and exercise apps of the week.....CalCutter, Meal Makeovers, and Moves! 

1- CalCutter

PLATFORM: Android and Apple
SUMMARY: Developed by the New York Department of Health, CalCutter calculates the estimated calories per serving in personal recipes and serves up healthy cooking tips. Recipe entry is easy, and recipes can be adjusted for different serving sizes. The app includes helpful information on topics like the impact of oil and zero-calories ingredients on recipe nutrient data, but the ingredient database is limited. 
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2-Moves

PLATFORM: Apple and Android
SUMMARY: Moves is a pedometer app that uses activity and place recognition algorithms to track steps taken or walking, running and cycling miles (when the mobile device is on the users person). The app can track calories burned based on users' anthropometric data, and it records weekly and daily summaries. But unless disabled, the app runs continuously, draining device battery life. 
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3- Meal Makeovers

PLATFORM: Apple
SUMMARY: From the kitchen of registered dietitian team the Meal Makeover Moms, Meal Makeovers is a recipe app that features healthier, more nutrient-rich versions of family favorites. With an easy-to-use interface that allows users to share recipes and save favorites, tips to tweak recipes to a family's taste preferences and basic nutrition information for all recipes, this app makes meal planning easier for families on the go. 

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The five R's of Motivation

Posted by deborah neiman on Wed, Nov 06, 2013 @ 09:44 AM

Getting Motivated to Change

If you are struggling to follow your weight management program, it may be because you are having difficulty maintaining motivation and commitment to weight control. Understanding the process required to increase your motivation may help you put your knowledge into action.

Motivation is more complex than simply wanting to do something. Your motivation to pursue a particular behavior is a reflection of your biological programming and psychological factors, such as your value system and the price you attach to success.

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The Five Rs of Motivation help you determine how motivated you are to lose weight. Ask yourself:

  1. Relevant – How is weight management relevant in my life?
  2. Risks – What are the risks in my life if I do not manage my weight?
  3. Rewards – What are the rewards if my life if I manage my weight?
  4. Roadblocks – What are the roadblocks to weight management in my life?
  5. Remove – How can I remove the roadblocks in order to manage my weight?

It’s important to acknowledge the cost of making a change so that it does not subconsciously undermine your motivation to change. It’s even more important, however, to focus on the value of the change in terms of your overall lifestyle. Motivation needs to be combined with readiness to change in order to stimulate action. Change rarely occurs in a straight line, and you may move back and forth through stages of readiness to change before you commit to making a lifestyle change. There are five stages of readiness for weight control – precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action and maintenance. These stages of readiness can be helpful to long-term weight management and lapses.

Lapses are a normal and common part of changing behavior. The important thing is not to give up simply because you’ve had a setback. Every step, even a step backward, is informative if you analyze and learn from it, using it to help you move toward the point where you can maintain your commitment to weight control.

*from the OPTIFAST Lifestyle Education Series™ 'Motivation to Change'

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Back To The Basics

Posted by deborah neiman on Tue, Nov 05, 2013 @ 10:31 AM

Healthy eating is all about balance – eating the right amount to match how active you are, and enjoying a variety of foods, so you get all the nutrients you need.

To function properly, the human body requires over 50 nutrients. No one single food or drink can provide us with all these nutrients at once, which is why eating a variety of foods in the right amounts each day is important to good health.


Use the portion plate to help you choose the right foods

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http://www.nestle.com/nhw/nutrition-basics

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Tips to Avoid Tempting Halloween Sweets

Posted by deborah neiman on Mon, Oct 28, 2013 @ 02:54 PM

Tips to Avoid Tempting Halloween Sweets

Keep your weight loss on track during the Halloween season with our simple strategies to enjoy the holiday without sacrificing your diet.

By Cynthia Pearson Reviewed by Melina Jampolis, M.D., 2009

Halloween brings many sweet temptations, each luring you away from heart-healthy eating. Our tips will help you navigate the ghoulish season with confidence -- from treat shopping to dealing with candy leftovers.

Rule No. 1: The basics of healthy eating don't go away during a holiday.

"Eat well," says Joanne Larsen, M.S., R.D., L.D. "Three nutritious meals with no more than four hours between them will keep you sated." Satisfied, with your blood sugar in check, the sight and smells of Halloween temptations -- be they waving from the grocery aisle, your candy-stocked cupboard, or a friend's party -- are less intense.

Most of us do better with healthy snacks between meals, so be sure to include them in your eating plan, Larsen says. Planning (not grabbing) is the key to keeping your overall daily intake of calories, fat, sodium, and cholesterol on track

Another tip: Stay hydrated, because thirst often masquerades as hunger. You may be tempted to eat a Halloween treat when you're really just thirsty.

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    • Buy Candy Late

       

      Having tempting candy around can be a big diet challenge. "There's no logical reason to purchase candy in advance of trick-or-treat night," says Jane Hemminger, R.D., L.D.

      Resist the urge to buy a bag of Skittles a month before the big night. By only storing the goodies for 24 hours, you can save yourself a lot of temptation. Also, you can usually find big discounts on candy sold that late.

       

    • Buy Candy You Don't Like

       

      Keep cravings at bay by purchasing treats that won't interest you. "Select trick-or-treat candy that you don't personally enjoy," says Jane Hemminger, R.D., L.D. "Then you won't be tempted to eat it."

      Not a coconut fan? Buy coconut-filled chocolate candy for your trick-or-treaters. Or maybe nut-filled treats don't tempt you -- Snickers or peanut M&Ms may be a good solution for your candy dish.

       

    • Store Halloween Treats Out of Sight

       

      Joanne Larsen, M.S., R.D., L.D., notes that we're much more likely to dip into food, regardless of whether we're hungry, when it's within view and in 2 yards' reach. So, store treats in drawers, behind doors, on high shelves, or in out-of-the-way pantries.

      Better yet, resist the temptation to open the bag. Once it's open, it's too easy to slip in for a quick bite.

       

      Eat Just the Best Parts of the Treat

       

      Baking Halloween treats at home can be its own temptation. Here's a trick: Don't eat the whole treat, just go for your favorite part. For example, if you love the tops of cupcakes best, eat just them; there's no rule saying you must also eat the base of the cupcake. It's not a free ride -- you're still consuming calories and fat -- but you're slimming down your totals with the smaller portion.

      Also, get rid of additional servings of Halloween candies. It's not budget-conscious, but it is belly-conscious. For example, if you love mellowcrème pumpkins but can't find them in a single-serving pack, set aside your allotted amount, then sit and nibble at each one, slowly, attentively. Then toss what remains

      This may seem wasteful, but in lieu of eating the whole bag during a sweet craving, give yourself permission to let the rest go. Or have a back-up plan like a friend at work who also enjoys the treats and will take the extras off your hands.

       

      Enjoy Parties for the Atmosphere, Not the Food

       

      Attend Halloween parties for the fun and friends, not the food. Note: Parties are full of fun distractions, including fun decor, making it a challenge to fully enjoy food and drink. Why waste allotted indulgences then?

      Joanne Larsen, M.S., R.D., L.D., suggests these Halloween party tips:

      - Have a healthy snack before you go so you arrive sated.
      - Plan ahead what you'll allow for food and drink, then stick to your plan.
      - Choose a small plate, allow yourself one trip to the spread, and sit and savor your food.
      - Position yourself away from food during the Halloween party.

      • Make Your Own Halloween Treats

         

        Halloween party is going to be full of tempting treats. Bring your own dish that you know you can healthfully enjoy.

        Be sure to bake shortly before the party rather than in advance so the dish won't tempt you for days. Divvy up any leftovers right at the party -- don't plan to take any home with you.

         

        Handle Halloween Temptation at the Workplace

         

        In a meeting where treats are served? You're a captive candy audience. "It's really, really difficult to pass up treats when someone brings them to the morning staff meeting and plops them on the table," says Jane Hemminger, R.D., L.D. "If you just can't resist, sample one small goodie or even just a bite-sized piece. Once everyone's had their turn at the offering, say, 'These look so good!' and move them to a side table where anyone wanting more will have to be deliberate about it or wait until the meeting's dismissed."

        This may seem a gutsy move, but most likely others will be grateful.

        If your workplace is a Halloween-treat offender (either before the season when coworkers are shopping or afterward when they dump their extra treats on the office), then hold off people by stocking the communal treat dish yourself. Hemminger suggests stocking the dish with treats you don't like so you won't even be tempted or fill it with healthier choices, such as plain nuts or small portions of these Heart-Healthy-approved candies.

        Another strategy is to reroute your normal walking path if you pass baskets of tempting candy. If you don't see it and aren't reminded of the treats, it's a lot easier to say no.

         

        Pack Sugar-Free Chewing Gum

         

        One simple, cheap strategy that works wherever temptation strikes -- at home, the workplace, or while shopping -- is to keep a stash of sugar-free gum on hand.

        "Faced with a temptation -- say, a sweet-smelling candy aisle or a pan of goodies awaiting departure to a party -- you can pop a piece of gum, deflecting temptation with bit of sweet chewing," says Jane Hemminger, R.D., L.D.

       

http://www.bhg.com/recipes/healthy/eating/tips-to-avoid-tempting-halloween-sweets/#page=11

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STICK WITH YOUR EXERCISE ROUTINE... Here's How!

Posted by deborah neiman on Fri, Oct 25, 2013 @ 12:17 PM

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Almost everyone has days where they don’t feel like exercising, but when
those days become too frequent and you completely lose your motivation to work
out that it becomes a problem. Research shows that half the people who start an
exercise program quit within six months. Those aren’t very encouraging
statistics, are they?

Most people begin a new exercise program with enthusiasm, but that
enthusiasm dwindles over time. Sound familiar? If you’re having trouble getting
motivated or are having problems sticking with your workouts, one of these
exercise motivation zappers could be the problem.

You’re Creating Too Many Barriers to Working Out

KISS (keep it simple stupid) applies to exercise too. One of the reasons
people lose their motivation to exercise is they make it too hard to get
started. If you have to get dressed, get in your car and drive to a gym, it’s
easy to find a reason not to do it. That’s when home workouts have the
advantage. Keep a DVD handy, push a few buttons and you have an instructor to
show you what to do and keep you motivated. You’ll be more enthusiastic if you
don’t have to jump through hoops to get your workout done.

You’re Bored

If you’re doing the same workout over and over, doing a different workout
can rekindle your enthusiasm. Try a new workout DVD instead of the same, old,
same old.

Exercise CAN make you look better in a pair of shorts or a swimsuit but
that shouldn’t be your primary motivation for doing it. Research shows that
people who exercise for health reasons – to feel better or relieve stress – are
more likely to stick with it. Exercise to feel stronger, have more energy and
to feel more empowered – don’t do it only to lose weight or inches off your
waistline.

You’re Overtraining

If you’re working out an hour or more every day without taking breaks,
you’re probably losing your motivation due to burnout. Take at least one full
day off a week and don’t be afraid to do a light workout when you don’t feel up
to a high-intensity one. Try a yoga workout for a change or work on flexibility
and balance. Make sure you’re sleeping enough and getting adequate nutrition.
It’s hard to stay motivated when you’re cutting back on calories too much or
skimping on sleep.

You’re Expecting Too Much Too Soon

Another reason people lose their motivation to exercise is because they
have unrealistic expectations. They expect to see results quickly and lose
their enthusiasm when they don’t. Again, it’s important to work out for the
right reasons – better health and more energy – not to change the number on a
scale. Nevertheless, keep in mind that it takes time to lose inches and see
more muscle definition. Don’t have unrealistic expectations.

A fitness journal helps you set goals, chart your progress and, yes, it can
keep you motivated too. When you write everything down, you can look back and
see how far you’ve come and it helps to keep you accountable. Don’t just write
down the exercises you do and your weight and measurements, document your goals
so you can look back and see why you started exercising in the first place.
Sometimes you need a reminder to help you stay on course.

 The Bottom Line?

Don’t let these exercise motivation zappers keep you from reaching your
goals. Make sure you HAVE goals, are exercising for the right reasons and
aren’t overdoing it or allowing yourself to become bored. Working out is one of
the best things you can do to stay healthy and to have more energy to enjoy
life to its fullest

For more fit tips contact our fitness trainer, Noelle Lusardi at noelle@stepaheadwellnesscenter.com, www.stepaheadwellnesscenter.com.

 

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5 WORST HALLOWEEN CANDIES - HOW TO INDULGE WITHOUT RUINING YOUR DIET!

Posted by deborah neiman on Wed, Oct 23, 2013 @ 01:08 PM

 

halloween candy surrey bc

A cocker spaniel weighs about 24 pounds. You know what else weighs 24 pounds? The
heft of candy the average American gobbles down each year, a big chunk of that
falling to our waistlines in the days before and after Halloween. Fun size? I
don't think so—unless it's fun being size 16. These stats could very well turn
you as white as a ghost:


  • Three miniature Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups—the kind you find in office candy bowls and trick-or-treat-bags—fill your belly with more sugar than a glazed doughnut.

  • Half a pack of Skittles has more sugar than a scoop of Haagen-Dazs Cookies and Cream Ice Cream. 

  • Nine Twizzlers carry as many calories as a Wendy’s Double Stack Burger.

These are some spooky treats. And Halloween is only the beginning of the eating season: Thanksgiving and Christmas are just around the corner. If you want to see your feet come January, start by conquering the sugar fest that’s nearly upon us. Here's your plan for surviving the scariest night of the year for your waistline. 

WORST “FUN SIZE” CANDY BAR

Butterfinger Bar (fun size bar)

100 calories

4 g fat (2 g saturated)

10 g sugars

Again, fun for whom? Your cardiologist? By calling it “fun,” food marketers are cleverly pulling your attention away from the fact that candy bars are flab-inducing logs of concentrated fats and sugars. And Butterfinger is the worst offender—there's no quicker way to swallow 100 calories.

Eat This, Instead!

3 Musketeers (fun size bar)

63 calories

2 g fat (1.5 g saturated)

10 g sugars



SURVIVAL TIP #1: Toss the candy bowl

Alabama researchers found that people who have snacks within reach when they're watching TV consume more calories per day overall. But instead of simply relocating the bowl to another table, limit the potential for mindless munching by keeping the candy bagged and in the cupboard.



SURVIVAL TIP #2: Consume drinks before treats

Drinking 16 ounces of water before a meal fills the stomach, quells hunger, and helps you lose weight, according to a study presented at the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. Use this strategy to help tamp your candy cravings. Just don't substitute a sugary beverage for the water or this strategy will backfire: A can of soda has more sugar than two Hershey’s Take 5
bars.

WORST FRUITY CANDY

Brach’s Airheads (3 pieces)

140 calories

1.5 g fat (1 g saturated)

19 g sugars

Here’s the basic formula for an Airhead: Sugar and filler carbohydrates, artificial colors and flavors, and partially hydrogenated oils—a source of trans fat. Don’t get me wrong. It’s not like our Eat This Instead, Dum Dums, are nutritional paragons, but they do have two noteworthy advantages over Airheads: They have no heart-wrecking oils, and they're hard candy. That means
they dissolve slowly on your tongue, letting you enjoy the sweetness over time.

Eat This, Instead!

Spangler Dum Dum Pops (3 pops)

77 calories

0 g fat

105 g sugars



SURVIVAL TIP #3: Work out on Halloween morning

Lifting weights reduces levels of blood sugar by 15 percent for more than 12 hours after you’ve left the gym, according to research from Syracuse University. Why does that matter? Some of the sugar you consume will stay in your blood stream, providing energy to your cells, instead of pitching a tent in your belly. 

SURVIVAL TIP #4: Switch to dark chocolate

It won’t necessarily save you calories, but dark chocolate boasts a bevy of health benefits that milk chocolate can’t claim. Flavonoids in the cocoa help keep your arteries soft, decreasing your risk of cardiovascular disease. And according to new research, a compound called epicatechin might help prevent brain damage from stroke. Keep a bar on hand to nibble on any time you have a craving. Seek out those bars with at least 60% cocoa.


WORST MINIATURE CANDY BARS

Twix Miniatures (3 pieces)

150 calories

8 g fat (6 g saturated)

15 g sugars

Twix has the worst saturated fat profile of any candy in your kid’s trick-or-treat bag. Think about it like this: Each one of these bite-sized candies carries 10 percent of the saturated fat you should consume in an entire day. Switch to Tootsie Rolls and you’ll cut your calories by more than half and trim your total fat intake by a whopping 81 percent.

Eat This Instead!

Tootsie Roll (3 pieces)

70 calories

1.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated)

9.5 g sugars

SURVIVAL TIP #5: Chew gum

Sort through any trick-or-treat bag and you’ll undoubtedly discover a handful of Super or Dubble Bubble—those small pink cubes wrapped in old-fashioned, end-twisted candy papers. Instead of plowing through the chocolates and taffies, throw a big gob of the gum in your mouth. The chewing suppresses cravings, and each piece has only about 15 calories.


SURVIVAL TIP #6: Don’t hand out your favorite candy

If your favorite candy is Milk Duds, and you’re handing out Milk Duds all night, doesn’t it seem likely that you’re going to wind up with a pound of chocolate and caramel in your stomach by night’s end? Of course! And that’s not even factoring in how many Duds you’ll plow through as they sit on the counter in the days leading up to Halloween. Choose something less tempting.


WORST CHEWY CANDY

Brach’s Milk Maid Caramels (4 pieces)

160 calories

4.5 g fat (3.5 g saturated)

16 g sugars

"Milk Maid” sounds a lot like "Milk Made,” doesn't it? Very clever, Brach's! This candy contains a couple milk derivatives (whey and “lipolyzed butter fat”), but it hardly constitutes a dairy product. Plus, 90 percent of the fat is saturated. That’s bad news for your heart. If you enjoy the challenge
of fighting chewy candy out of your teeth, switch over to Now and Later and save more than 100 calories per serving.

Eat This, Instead!

Now and Later (4 pieces)

53 calories

0.5 g fat (0 g saturated)

10 g sugars



SURVIVAL TIP #7: Keep the candy-calorie load to 400

The fewer calories you take in during candy season, the better off you’ll be
heading into turkey season. So if you worry that you risk overindulgence, set a
caloric limit and hold yourself to it. Four hundred is a good number—indulgent
yet not overly destructive. That means you could eat every “Eat This Instead”
on our list, and have 65 calories left for one of your personal favorites.



SURVIVAL TIP #8: Don’t skip dinner

A healthy dinner will take the edge off your candy craving, not to mention
temper the blood-sugar rush that converts your body into a flab factory and
puts you at risk for diabetes. What you want is a meal rich with fiber and lean
protein—think chicken breast with vegetables. 


WORST NOVELTY CANDY

Reese’s Pumpkin

170 calories

10 g fat (3 g saturated)

16 g sugars

This one should send your gimmick radar into the red zone. It’s simply an oversized peanut butter cup shaped like a pumpkin. What price novelty? Nearly two-thirds more calories than a regular Reese’s peanut butter cup! Grab two bite-size Reese's instead—you'll save more than half the calories, fat, and sugar. 

Eat This, Instead!

Reese's Bite Size Peanut Butter Cups (2 pieces)

72 calories

4 g fat (3 g saturated)

6 g sugars

SURVIVAL TIP #9: Take it outside

The worst thing you can do on Halloween night, after most of the trick-or-treaters have cleared off the street, is set your candy bowl by the door where you can grab a handful every day on your way out. Noshing 300 extra candy calories a day will add a pound of flab to your frame in less than two weeks. Instead, set the bowl on the porch before you go to bed. The leftover candy will be gone by morning, guaranteed.

SURVIVAL TIP #10: Remember: Halloween is a one-day event

A study in the journal of Nature Neuroscience found that eating junk food doesn’t just satisfy cravings—it creates them. That’s right; junk food is addictive. Limit your sugar splurging to October 31. If you start a week early, you’re going to have a serious candy habit to break after Halloween. You might find it to be frightfully difficult.

FOR MORE FIT TIPS CONTACT OUR CERTIFIED TRAINER NOELLE LUSARDI AT stepaheadwellnesscenter.com

 

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